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33 Opportunities to Use Descriptive Language | MagzWeb

Ready to start your search for the perfect words?

Here are 33 instances where you can opt for descriptive language that reveals your point of view, rather than an obvious choice that doesn’t enhance your writing voice.

It’s not always appropriate to get super detailed, but don’t settle for generic phrases because you’re afraid of excluding people who don’t have the same taste.

The more intimately you get to know each word in your writing, the more confident you can be that your content will make an imprint in your reader’s mind.

You’re hooking your ideal reader on your writing, so they become a part of your audience.

For each category below, review how the different examples alter a reader’s experience with your text.

Coffee

Pour over, sparkling espresso, or cold brew?

Tea

Earl grey with cream and sugar, yerba maté, or chamomile?

Alcohol

IPA, gin and tonic, or Jack Daniel’s?

Water

San Pellegrino, flat, or Bubly?

Writing utensils

Black ballpoint, red felt tip, or mechanical pencil?

Trees

Cypress, palm, or sycamore?

Flowers

Cherry blossom, rose, or daisy?

Houses

A-frame cabin, condo, or mansion?

Pets

Maine Coon, Pomeranian, or American Pit Bull Terrier?

Chairs

Desk, bean bag, or bar stool?

Exercise equipment

Kettlebell, yoga mat, or Peloton?

Glassware

Mason jar, Champagne flute, or martini glass?

Plates

Plastic, paper, or ceramic?

Cereal

Frosted Flakes, Cheerios, or MUSH Overnight Oats?

Yogurt

Plain Greek, low-fat blueberry, or vanilla soy?

Meat

Wagyu beef sliders, patty melt, or Beyond burger?

Art

Warhol, Renaissance, or sacred geometry?

Candles

Tealight, taper, or pillar?

Clothing

Suit, sweats, or shawl?

Cosmetics

Drugstore, Sephora, or Yves Saint Laurent?

Jewelry

Antique, vintage, or artisan?

Perfume

Chanel, Bath & Body Works, or patchouli?

Eyewear

Stainless steel, plastic, or frameless?

Masks

Cloth, N95, or bandana neck gaiter?

Films

Casablanca, Psycho, or Fight Club?

Television shows

Cobra Kai, I Love Lucy, or Battlestar Galactica?

Music

The Beatles, Joy Division, or Public Enemy?

Computers

Desktop, laptop, or tablet?

Phones

Android, iPhone, or Nokia flip phone?

Fans

Ceiling, tower, or bladeless?

Documents

Digital, lined notebook, or copy paper?

Offices

Taupe walls and windowless cubicles, high ceilings and an open floor plan, or a makeshift workspace on a dining room table?

AI

Alexa, Google, or Siri?

“Easy reading is damn hard writing …”

The subheadline above is often attributed to Nathaniel Hawthorne, but since we can’t always verify the accuracy of a quote or source, I’d like to share the lesser-known second half of that sentence. 😉

“Easy reading is damn hard writing … so you’re subscribed to Copyblogger, right?”

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Laya

Helping creatives to turn offline experiences into online income At the age of 18, I decided to leave my home and move to Italy. With no plan, no income, no idea what I'm up to. I just wanted to take the leap! Long story short, I ended up getting into a freelance design which later brought me to website design & online courses. Now, proud to be location independent digital nomad, I help creatives to turn their offline experiences into online income!

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